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20130216
20130224
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> i'm a clinton person. that is the way politics is. >> bill: how does president obama stack up against president clinton? >> he needs to go into the room >> bill: here come the lawsuits against carnival cruise operation. he millions of dollars will be sought with the ship falling apart on the high seas. is it legal? >> caution you are about to enter the no-spin zone. factor begins right now. ♪ ♪ >> bill: i'm bill o'reilly, thanks for watching tonight. what is the biggest problem facing the country today? that is the subject of this evening's talking points. on paper the biggest problem is the national debt approaching $70 trillion with no end in sight and failure of pinheads to deal with the debt in washington. if the massive borrowing continues the u.s. economy could very well collapse, but in reality, no on the paper, the biggest problem the nation has is us, our mentality. it is changing. after the allies defeated nazis in world war ii millions of people returned home to start families and careers. prevailing wisdom was simple, work hard, respect your country, provide a
last name as colbert, not colbert. >>> former secretary of state hillary clinton, mrs. clinton is set to make more than $200,000 per speaking appearance. now that she's left foggy bottom, she was making $186,000 a year as secretary of state. not bad money. >>> well, coming up, is there a method to their madness? our war room will have the president versus the republicans on the sequester battle as drastic cuts are set to take effect in six days. >> first, an italian newspaper is out with a bombshell report on why it says the pope really resigned. we'll get the latest from rome right after the break. 1942. [ all ] fort benning, georgia, in 1999. [ male announcer ] usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation because it offers a superior level of protection and because usaa's commitment to serve the military, veterans, and their families is without equal. begin your legacy. get an auto-insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to serve. when you lost the thing you can't believe you lost.. when what you just bought, just broke. or when you have a little troub
hillary clinton that said it was unfit for her to the commander in chief. it was only banning a movie that would be available on pay- per-view cable. an adult cannot watch something in the privacy of their own home on pay-per-view because mccain- feingold banned it. do you really want to ban movies? the answer is perhaps yes, which is why i did not want to reverse citizens united. the second issue that came out of the decision is that all new avenues of disclosure -- i am not sure where this comes from, the reality is the court has upheld some disclosure, has struck other disclosure. the kaine- -- mccain-feingold were upheld in the mcconnell case, and what they out was a one-page disclosure regime for television and radio ads and movies that air on television, run within a well-defined parks ability to federal election that referenced a candidate. this does not give license to all sorts of other expensive disclosure machines or call from barclay, which limited the reach of disclosure. scored struck disclosure in the davis case in which most had written off on a millionaires' kids, but
. because remember, in '95 or '96 with -- under the gingrich/dick armey congress bill clinton was able to force them to raise the minimum wage and there were those referenda you talked about. one of the key points that ought to be made and one of the reasons why older studies -- we no longer -- the minimum wage does not apply very much in manufacturing. when you are dealing with manufacturing, which is done across national lines, there could be some negative economic effect in terms of transferring out. we know people are ready to move jobs out. but overwhelmingly today, minimum wage jobs are in the service industries. if the restaurant down the street is charging a little more because of wages, you can't go to malaysia for a sandwich. and so it's food service. the supermarkets and restaurants. if you look at where the minimum wage has an effect, it is in those areas in america that are really not subject to foreign competition. because they're not making things. they are performing a service for which people need to be physically present. this is part of the test of whether or not the
closely with mrs. clinton in deciding about the colors, the designs that would go on the service, how those particular colors would looked in the various settings in the state dining room are the east room. i do remember mrs. clinton's mother was living in the house at the time. she would come to some of these little meetings about showing samples from the porcelain factory. none of them seem to be satisfactory. she said of in the bathroom of my suite is a beautiful yellow color. she said i think we should try that yellow color. so we got a sample of the wallpaper and sent it off to lennox, and they did some samples, and it worked out beautifully. i think that was mrs. rodham's legacy in terms of state dinners. [laughter] >> let's go to looking at the transitions into the white house that a family makes and the transitions out as well. often, for a president, he has been running for office for a couple of years and he is a political person who has most likely been at the white house numerous times, but in coming into the white house, the first ladies really have not spent much time. w
santorum was much more in sync with the base then senator clinton was with the democratic party base. she was a pro-work candidate in an inside or party -- a pro-war candidate in an anti-war party. >> what you think it santorum had had perry's early money? >> what we know about the republican party? what we know about mitt romney? >> moderate mormon from massachusetts, right? >> i think it is a testament to his political skills that he did not begin with a natural geographical or ideological base. but he was able to shift political skill to taking positions that in many cases people disagree with. like health care. but to convince the republican party he had the qualities that they wanted to be his nominee. >> it is pretty dicey where every week there was a new w hack-a-mole conservative challenger. we went from rick perry to herman cain, and then there was that moment where he blew up at the bloomberg debate. who were these voters? not who were they -- but it started with trump and michele bachmann. it seemed like it was the same 20% of the electorate. >> i just want to add, you know, go
submitted by hillary clinton. third, dealing with the types of oils that is being studied. the scientists have also studied it. it is not a thought. there is science based on those three factors. >> absolutely. the pipeline being proposed has got to be the most studied pipeline ever proposed on the planet. i do not know if there is a valve at every hinge, but there are extra measures that they took on board because of the concerns raised on nebraska and other places. they have gone out of their way to ensure that a modern, high- tech pipeline with lots of extra features would be the state this possible way to get the oil to its destination. >> i do not want to prolong the argument about the myths and non=myths,, but back to the oil. let's say it was successful in not being exported somewhere else. there would still be hundreds of barrels coming from someplace else. it is important to realize that the amount of oil that will be consumed would be the same. that oil has its own risk associated with it. tankers are notoriously risky for bringing oil. i think we have to look at this on balance
wore a hillary clinton mask, the other wore a giant panda suit, which freedom works had used at protests to denounce progresses as panderers. what they were acting out was not pandering but rather something else. okay. you can now uncover your children's eyes. but this is just the latest detail in the ongoing drama that is the slow unraveling over freedom works. it is also the detail of how the former chairman of the group, dick armey, stormed into the group's office with a man with a gun when he was reportedly trying to seize control of the group away from the group's president, matt kibbe. there was also dick armey accusing matt kibbe of using freedomworks' staff to write his own book while all the proceeds of the book went to him there was dick armey's letter resigning of chairman of freedomworks, demanding that the group stop using his name and likeness and his book and demanding specifically that freedomworks deliver his official dick armey portrait to his goat farm in texas. and after all of that, there was the panda suit thing with the interns. ew. over at the other na
in the east room of the white house. each of us on either side of president clinton as he announced the once unthinkable normalization of our relations with vietnam, and efforts that john mccain and i worked on for about 10 years. to try to. in the last decade, thanks in large part to the work of usaid, our exports to vietnam increased by more than 700%. every one of those percentage points our jobs here in america. in the last two decades, 1000 vietnamese students and scholars have studied spanish and taught in america through the fulbright program, including the foreign minister of,who i just talked to the other day and who has feelings about america because of that engagement. the list goes on. as the emerging middle class in india, the world's largest democracy, buys our products, that means jobs and incomes for our own middle-class. as our traditional assistance to brazil and decreases, trade there is increasing. brazil is one of the new tigris moment at a double-digit pace. it supports additional jobs here at home, many in the u.s. travel and tourism industry. when jefferson expanded o
primary vote was more in sync than senator clinton was for the democratic party base, and she obviously senator santorum didn't have the formidable apparatus, he didn't have the body weight -- >> do you think if santorum had had perry's early money it's a different -- >> well, i think it's -- what do we know about the republican party? it's increasingly evangelical, southern and populist. what do we know about mitt romney? [laughter] i think that is a testament to his political skill, that he didn't begin this with a natural, geographical or ideological base. and yet he was able particularly in those debates through, i think, sheer political skill to -- taking positions that in many cases people disagreed with. like health care. but to convince the republican party that he had the qualities that they wanted to be their nominee. >> what would you gees seeing in your -- you gees seeing in your debates where every year it was the new whack-a-mole, conservative challenger. so we went from perry to herman cain next? herman cain was next, right? in that sort of moment, and then he blew up at
. each of us on either side of president clinton as he announced the once unthinkable normalization of our relations with vietnam, and efforts that john mccain and i worked on for about 10 years to try do. in the last decade, thanks in large part to the work of usaid, our exports to vietnam increased by more than 700%. every one of those percentage points our jobs here in america. in the last two decades, 1000 vietnamese students and scholars have studied spanish and taught -- have studied and taught in america through the fulbright program, including the foreign minister, who i just talked to the other day and who has feelings about america because of that engagement. the list goes on. as the emerging middle class in india, the world's largest democracy, buys our products, that means jobs and incomes for our own middle-class. as our traditional assistance to brazil and decreases, trade there is increasing. brazil is one of the new tigers moving at a double-digit pace. it supports additional jobs here at home, many in the u.s. travel and tourism industry. when jefferson expanded our
on the history, but when i was offered this job i secretary clinton, the prior offense -- office had lost the confidence of key officials in the u.s. government. i thought it was a chance to start over, and i think that probably a lot of what we are doing was in the original conception. i am trying not to throw out the baby with the bathwater. nobody has said that since their grandmother died, right? i do not know why that phrase came up. my feeling is that i think the original intent was to be strategic and have a policy influence, and then when it went through its middle stages as a coordinator, it never gained traction in the state department. it then went into a supplier of people, which i thought was too limited. so, we have tried to recapture that we want to be part of the policy conversation. we have been very fortunate to have the dynamic support of secretary clinton for the first year of our existence. now, what we are finding is in the handful of meetings i have had with secretary kerry, is he has said give me ideas and we have to find a different way of doing some of these thin
to anything like that but it is was remarkable that he was one of the 4,000 a day according to the clinton justice department that do use a firearm in self-defense. obviously, he is pretty happy he was able to do so. >> next call comes from alabama. caller: good morning, sir. i'm a first time caller. appreciate c-span. my comments or issues are is that the majority of these people are talking about second amendment rights. they have to realize that the second amendment was written years and years ago. things do get amended. the people who we put there to control these laws, they are being controlled by lobbyists, the n.r.a. ena other groups also. let's see if we can contribute to these congressman and other people, who is going to protect us instead of doing what they want to do. guest: well, i think the caller is making an argument that is frequently made by people who have questions about the second amendment. yeah, the second amendment was written in the 18th century. so was the first amendment. yes, many years have gone by and firearms have developmented, technology has changed but we
-state landslide but claimed 119 counties. bill clinton won with 1,524 counties. do you know how many counties obama won last year? 690. that's it. 690. even though he won a convincing popular vote majority. gerrymandering wasn't a complete nonfactor in 2012. the gop probably did grab a few extra seats because of it. but the real problem for democrats is that their base of support is less spread out geographically than it's ever been, which means they can win presidential races and even control the senate, but when it comes to the house, their best, their only chance for the foreseeable future is a massive anti-gop tide, like something we saw in 2006 or 2008. short of that, the era of republican speakers could last for a long time. okay, that does it for "the
clinton. but not politically. let me talk about this, because you're on the front all the time fighting for same-sex rights and gay rights generally. isn't it odd that in a country where we have begun to shift dramatically in that action towards more than acceptance, almost warm acceptance, it's much more positive, okay, we'll go along with that. at the same time we still have a country that still seems to defend gun rights almost to the last man in so many communities. are they different communities? >> i think so. there is a whole range of issues, you know, that we could talk about from reproductive rights to climate change. but i think when it comes to same-sex marriage, we talked earlier about illinois which is poised to be the next state to vote in favor, i think the trajectory both in terms of public sentiment. when i started at hrc, it was 33% of the american people, now it's 43, 53. it will be 60% before long. you have the chairman of the republican party of illinois coming out in favor of this vote, which is significant. >> even ted cruz says leave it up to the states. >> leave
. and what bill clinton and the democratic party discovered when the issue was working in their favor in the 1990s is there is lots of constituents in the country who don't feel that way about guns. certain things on the ground have changed. the democratic party have changed be. uin some ways, they're recovering lost knowledge from a previous generation of democrats that actually did know this back in the mid 1990s. >> do you think they're also recognizing that it's not just the median gun owner in oklahoma, doesn't represent the country as a whole, but also the -- the statements of the national rifle association. >> absolutely. >> do not even represent the beliefs of the standard national rifle association member. i mean there is also -- >> yep. >> this dysmorphia between who speaks on the issue and who has strong feelings about the iraq. >> i am now forever going to conjure the image of wayne lapierre when i hear the word dysmorphia. that actually has gotten worse. one of the perverse consequences of republican conservative victory guns is that the nra increasingly has had to justif
. he can in one time and took almost a year in the clinton administration if you recall that period of time. so, we may be under a different watch for a while of the chairman were to. >> you've watched the commission over the years. how would you characterize some of the changes that have gone on in just how the commission operates in the relationship among the tension how would you characterize the change of the commission over the past ten, 20 years? >> as far as collegiality goes it does vary between the administration and between i think the chairman who set the stage. i think to his credit the commissioners while they are quite split on their philosophy, there - three philosophy i think they all get along personally well and it's to their credit. i don't see any major sports that way. i think if people seem to -- they are adults over there and i think that is relatively good. i do see a lot of differences the commission and by regulated and the one today in the sense of the communications have become so important and you do have the open meeting and they are not able to talk. y
has brought in bill clinton to bring in a word to it, and talk about how true to life politically it s. so who knows, who knows what kind of flesh clinton press sort so to speak. >> well, david, i want to ask you about another snub, best supporting actor category, and performance they would say is the performance of the year got nada, zippo, and look at this clip. >> in part of london. no one has yet claimed responsibility for what sources are calling a cyber terrorist assault on the british secret service. early reports from the scene indicate at least six dead, many more injured, with victims being evacuated to local hospitals within minutes of the explosion. >> david, you just saw the performance. wolf blitzer. outrage! i cannot believe this. there is a write-in campaign? >> there really ought to be a special award. >> it was a critical moment in that film too, "skyfall," a film that grossed over $1 billion at the box office. i had a major contributing little role over there, didn't i? >> agree, and i think you see daniel craig's expression when he hears that that was off you. >> ex
your time back in the state department in the clinton years you were involved in some early efforts to curb greenhouse gas emissions. i don't know if you have any perspective on less sorns learned -- lessons learned in the approach tried then. >> i think we made a number of mistakes. it was me at least in part. what did we really learn? i think the most important lesson from kyoto is you can not negotiate a treaty unless you're prepared to do stuff at home to meet the requirements. and i think, it wasn't enough thinking that went into what it is that the u.s. was prepared to do domestically before kyoto was negotiated. and then of course we had other reasons it was never submitted to the senate and so on and so on. i think, we were great at the negotiation but it really didn't mean anything because we didn't have a program here to actually get it implemented. the other, the other lesson, and, again, i'm partly the problem here. is that, we had just sort of come off the montreal protocol which i think was a very successful international agreement. and we thought we should model a cli
major address after taking over that position from hillary clinton. he's speaking at the university of virginia. let's listen in. >> maybe he knows something. i could learn a thing or two from them. we didn't overlap for long. but i want to tell everybody here that we know each other pretty well from service as a lieutenant-governor and when he was governor as the state. i was lieutenant-governor of my state. so we have that in common before being senators. i will tell you a quick story. i don't know -- what you -- i don't know what you do in virginia as lieutenant- governor. but massachusetts, once upon a time calvin coolidge was lieutenant-governor. he was at a dinner party and his interim governor turned to him and said what do you do? he said i'm the interim governor of massachusetts. he said wow! that must be interesting. he said tell me all about the job. and he says i just did. [laughter] >> i trust because they embraced you and me, we made something more out of it. but i have huge admiration for tim cain. congressman hurtt referred to his work in honduras. just helping other
with and president clinton. we balanced the budget five of those 14 years. it meant that there was compromise. this requires compromise. this requires the republicans stepping forward with some ideas about how to keep essential services of the government running at the level people have been accustomed to. this is not rocket science. this is people coming together the way that other congresses have done to solve big issues. i suggest that my former colleague on the republican side, go see the movie " "lincoln," because it shows how hard it was back then to get it done. what he did is he gathered people around him in a way i believe president obama is doing by calling republicans, talking to them, trying to work with them, and when that happens, big things get solved. the fiscal cliff got solved because people started talking to one another. >>> up next assistant secretary of state discusses u.s. foreign policy efforts to improve conflict prevention and addressing crises. the secretary of the newly created state department team responsible for the government's role of countries and conflict in
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)